KingCheetah's Domain

"This is actually kind of crazy. Talk about a weird thing. Rocky Raccoon is one of my favourite songs. For some reason, [the song] just fucking kills me. It’s pathetic; it destroys me. When the role of Rocket Raccoon came upon us, I was talking to James Gunn and I said, ‘I’m doing this movie now, and we’re always tripping on Rocky Raccoon. Isn’t it weird that I’m playing Rocket Raccoon?’ He told me that was the inspiration for the character, that song. I don’t know if that’s the truth, but it’s what he said, which if that’s the truth, it’s kind of insane.”

(Source: avatarwinchester, via thegoddamnwerewolf)

melsephant:

I’ve been playing cat simulator lately and it’s pretty fun

(via aloneinthedaydream)

applejuiceforstrider:

eternal-bloom:

THERE IS A POLAR BEAR QUICKLY AMBLING TOWARDS ME OH MY HEART

"Hup hup hup hup"

applejuiceforstrider:

eternal-bloom:

THERE IS A POLAR BEAR QUICKLY AMBLING TOWARDS ME OH MY HEART

"Hup hup hup hup"

(Source: collegehumor, via deadcayot3)

furnisium:

cutie-pie-naegi:

latching-on-to-youu:

Start and end your day right.

Deadmau5 has ascended.

holy shit

furnisium:

cutie-pie-naegi:

latching-on-to-youu:

Start and end your day right.

Deadmau5 has ascended.

holy shit

(via deadcayot3)

gonicko98 said: I can wait for the new Bugs Bunny show Wabbit to come on Cartoon Network. Also i like the hilarious, heroic and mischievous Bugs Bunny that i know and love. :)

theltshow:

I can’t wait either. I’m getting a bit nutty. 

theurbanfoxwatcher:

corvis-vulpes-lupus:

Two Red Fox Fighting For Dominance In The Wilds Of Alaska.

Foxes don’t “fight for dominance”, they fight for territory, food and breeding rights. Foxes aren’t interested in dominating each other (in the traditional sense) any more than wolves are and, just like wolves, foxes live in family groups with the parent on top and their offspring as natural followers. 
True aggression of this nature only occurs between unrelated individuals (scraps also occur between family members but they are nowhere near as serious.) If it’s a fight between two males then one is likely an intruder wanting to take over the territory, a very common occurrence in winter as young foxes disperse and try to find a territory of their own.
Before any fighting occurs foxes will go through ritualized displays to show off their strength, attempt to cool the tension and avoid having to fight. Only as a last resort will they end up fighting because it’s not something they want to do, but as a potential threat to him and his family the resident male will have to fend off the intruder. Sometimes even the vixen will join in and help to chase the intruder away, however, if the resident looses he will be forced to leave. There is no dominating going on, at least not in the traditional sense of how dominance has been described in canids. The resident male simply wants to protect his home and family and dominance is an incorrect way to describe these behaviors. 

theurbanfoxwatcher:

corvis-vulpes-lupus:

Two Red Fox Fighting For Dominance In The Wilds Of Alaska.

Foxes don’t “fight for dominance”, they fight for territory, food and breeding rights. Foxes aren’t interested in dominating each other (in the traditional sense) any more than wolves are and, just like wolves, foxes live in family groups with the parent on top and their offspring as natural followers. 

True aggression of this nature only occurs between unrelated individuals (scraps also occur between family members but they are nowhere near as serious.) If it’s a fight between two males then one is likely an intruder wanting to take over the territory, a very common occurrence in winter as young foxes disperse and try to find a territory of their own.

Before any fighting occurs foxes will go through ritualized displays to show off their strength, attempt to cool the tension and avoid having to fight. Only as a last resort will they end up fighting because it’s not something they want to do, but as a potential threat to him and his family the resident male will have to fend off the intruder. Sometimes even the vixen will join in and help to chase the intruder away, however, if the resident looses he will be forced to leave. There is no dominating going on, at least not in the traditional sense of how dominance has been described in canids. The resident male simply wants to protect his home and family and dominance is an incorrect way to describe these behaviors.